Making the World a Better Place: The Maxwell School of Citizenship

Feb 05, 17 Making the World a Better Place: The Maxwell School of Citizenship

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During uncertain times and periods of global upheaval, it is good to know there are well-trained minds working on the most serious issues of our times. Special academic institutions like the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, located at Syracuse University, help educate and influence the global leaders of the future. Founded in 1924 with $500,000 to begin a school which would “cull from every source those principles, facts, and elements which, combined, make up our rights and duties and our value and distinctiveness at US citizens.” The Maxwell School became the first school in the country to offer a program in public administration, and now has the oldest, continuously operating University-based MPA in the US. Meet some of the outstanding graduates of this graduate program. What greater goal in life is there than bringing peace to the world? Sonya Reines-Djivanides, through her role in Brussels as the executive director of the European Peacebuilding Liaison Office (EPLO), is trying to achieve just that. Reines-Djivanides leads the EPLO in its function as a place where NGOs and think tanks work together to explore how the players on the world stage can prevent violent conflict. Previously she was the chair of the EPLO’s steering committee. She also was the director of the Brussels Headquarters of Search for Common Ground, where she served from 2009 to 2015. Jason Cole earned his Master’s in Public Administration in 1998. After 16 years of experience in government and government relations, Cole was recently named to be associate vice president of university relations at Cornell University. He has extensive experience in organizational leadership, public policy development, advocacy, media relations, brand campaigning and pollical issues. The Maxwell School also contributes leaders to the world of community organizations and grass-roots social improvement.  Kimberlin Butler, a 2003 graduate of the Master’s in Public Administration Program, received recognition for her work as interim director of programs and partnerships at Beyond 12. The Atlanta Business Chronicle listed Butler among its “40 Under 40” award winners...

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Brooklyn Boom Extends to Gowanus

Dec 26, 16 Brooklyn Boom Extends to Gowanus

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Once disdained as a go-to place in Brooklyn, Gowanus, found between Park Slope and Carroll Gardens, has been making a (positive) name for itself. Once known for its stinky canal and plethora of car repair shops, the area has been remaking itself into a fun place to visit, and maybe even live. Here are a few new fixtures in the constantly changing landscape of Gowanus, Brooklyn: Twig Terrariums: This must be a real rarity, if not unique. It is certainly brilliant. This shop offers easy-to-care-for terrariums; either custom-made or DIY with a kit. This partnership between two friends, Katy Maslow and Michelle Inciarrano, gets their greenery from local nurseries, and their fabulous glass bowls from boutique glass blowers across the country. Some of the glass globes are hand-blown. For those of us that enjoy being surrounded with greenery, but just don’t have the time to care for plants, a terrarium is a wonderful compromise between the joy of growing something and the care it requires. 287 Third Avenue, 718-488-8944, twigterrariums.com The Royal Palms Shuffleboard Club: Mimicking the great shuffleboard clubs of Miami Beachand the great cruise lines, this club will even let people under 55 years old play this fascinating game, made all the more interesting by the incredible drinks available from the bar. Playing shuffleboard brings out the “cruise-desire” in all of us, which is can be readily satisfied with the tropics-inspired cocktails the in-house mixologists concoct. All that drinking and shuffling can make a body hungry, but do not fear just because the establishment does not actually serve any food. Every day a new food-truck pulls up to the premises, making a visit to the Royal Palms even more of an incredible adventure. You can find Indian food one day, lobster rolls the next, and on and on. 514 Union Street, 347-223-4410, royalpalmsshuffle.com Pig Beach: What does a Brooklynite do in the middle of the winter when he is craving some good old barbecue? He heads on over to Pig Beach and...

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Eamon Rockey Helping Celebrate 333 Years of Gaggenau

Sep 25, 16 Eamon Rockey Helping Celebrate 333 Years of Gaggenau

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New Yorkers looking for a great meal in a restaurant with a top-notch bar have discovered Betony. This high-end eatery offers a lot more than just exquisite food. General Manager Eamon Rockey, along with his team of mixologists, have taken the concept of restaurant bar to a whole new level. Until the advent of Rockey and his staff transformed Betony’s bar into an adventure in cocktails, the main purpose of a bar in a restaurant was to keep the customers happy until their tables were ready for them. Not so at Betony: here you find that many of your bar companions have come exclusively for the bar. And no wonder. The cocktails on hand, created by Eamon and his staff, are nothing if not fun. Original and amusing, wouldn’t you love to try a drink with the cognomen of Rifflin’ Dixie, The Socratic Oath, or Eat a Peach? The joy in creating these specialty drinks is shared by the bar tenders gladly with their customers. No question is too basic. On the contrary: the staff is ready to not only share their knowledge, but will pour samples of their creations, free, if you express even the slightest hint that you might want to have a taste of something you’ve never heard of before. The fun atmosphere, delicious drinks, and amazing food, which can also be ordered at the bar, is what keeps New Yorkers coming back. Eamon Rockey will be making an appearance at the exclusive pop-up Restaurant 1683 for two of the four days that Gaggenau will be celebrating its 333rd anniversary. From September 26 to 29, three Michelin star chef Daniel Humm, together with restaurateur Will Guidara, will be serving guests at a by-invitation-only sensory extravaganza. For those perhaps less foodie and clued in to the highest end of food production, Gaggenau is a German brand of food design and technology, whose history dates back to 1683.  On the program will be a multi-sensory experience which will present the history of Gaggenau...

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Get Real Achaar from Brooklyn Delhi

Mar 28, 16 Get Real Achaar from Brooklyn Delhi

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Until Chitra Agrawal started making her own achaar– strongly flavored Indian pickles- it was impossible to get properly made achaar in New York. Growing up, Agrawal loved eating lots of achaar, made by her aunts and grandmother back in India. When she grew up, she would bring back jars of the delicious treat back with her from India to New York. When Agrawal and her then boyfriend Ben Garthus finished the pickles, they soon realized that it was impossible to get as good tasting achaar in New York. She thought they were made with too much salt, preservatives, and “really bad oils.” Agrawal decided the time had come to simply make them herself. “Achaar is made all over India, but the type of fruits, vegetables, and oils they use vary by location,” Agrawal explained. “In the south, they often use sesame oil and spices like fenugreek. In the north, they might make it from carrot or cauliflower, in a base of mustard oil with nigella seeds.” Agrawal’s achaar is made with small amounts of salt and oil, allowing the freshness of the local ingredients she was using burst through. The first few batches that she made she served at pop-up dinners and cooking classes that she was already hosting. “People responded because they’re really different in flavor and more intense than something like a chutney, which you make and eat when it’s fresh” she said. “With achaar, the flavor gets better over time.” With so much support from the people who tried her achaar, she decided to launch Brooklyn...

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The Fuel that Drives the New York Fashion Engine

Mar 09, 16 The Fuel that Drives the New York Fashion Engine

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Many observers recognize New York as the fashion capital of the world. Have you ever wondered about the people that have helped to create this reputation for the Big Apple? In 2015 there were some special designers that added to New York’s reputation in this trillion-dollar industry. Kara Laricks is an enormously successful fashion designer, but she did not start out in this profession; not even close. For ten years she worked as a teacher of elementary school children. Although she loved design as a child, she decided to choose a “safe” profession. She was born in 1973, and graduated from Academy of Art University of San Francisco in 2008. She now lives and works in New York City. Born on May 31, 1986, Jérôme´ LaMaar is a fifth generation New Yorker, of Cuban, Ethiopian and Afro-Portuguese heritage. Born in the Bronx, he began his career in fashion when he was only 15, working as an intern for Baby Phat by Kimora Lee Simons, in 2001. Also uncertain about his career direction, (like Laricks), LaMaar first enrolled at Brown University with the intention of studying Physics. Lucky for us fashionistas he decided to head for the walkway and went to the Fashion Institute of Technology right here in NYC, studying Fashion Design and Fabric Styling. Oh, and we know his birthday from his label: 5:31 Jérôme. Kim Haller is not a native New Yorker. She was raised in Indiana until she moved with her family to Australia.  In the mid-1980s she came back to the US to attend the Parsons School of Design. Haller joined Calvin Klein in 1989 and within her first year there became their main knitwear designer. She launched her own consultancy business in 1995, Kim Haller Design. Her firm gave concept, design and technical support to up-and-running designers who were anxious to expand and develop their knitwear collections. The great industry of fashion is fueled by a wide variety of talented, hard-working individuals who are creative, innovative and from an...

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The Salt Marsh in Marine Park is a lot of Nature in a Big City

Feb 16, 16 The Salt Marsh in Marine Park is a lot of Nature in a Big City

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The largest park in Brooklyn is ready and waiting for visitors to experience the natural world in the midst of the crazy turbulence of living in Brooklyn. The Salt Marsh is 530 acres of grassland and marsh. It is home to countless birds and animals, including egrets, geese, sandpipers, marsh hawks, cottontail rabbits, and horseshoe crabs. Located at 3301 Avenue U, not far from Flatbush Avenue, the Salt Marsh has five miles of shoreline and a well-marked nature walk that loops back over its 1-mile length, and is mostly flat. Open from dawn to dusk, be aware that the path is dirt and gravel, and not shaded. In the summer be sure to bring lots of insect repellent and sunscreen. There is a wonderful nature center which is open from April 1 to October 31 on weekends from noon until 4pm. Kids can learn a lot about nature there, and so can adults. There are many demonstrations, lectures and events which are quite worthwhile. After your visit to the nature reserve, go visit the recreational park right on the other side of Avenue U. Marine Park is a 268-acre recreational park with baseball fields, tennis courts and bike paths with bike rentals available. For more information, go to the park’s...

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